Where’s that Seawolf spirit?

Homecoming is a time for students to come together, drawn by the unexplainable force of school spirit, to energize and encourage their home team during events the week before the big game – or at least that’s what most schools consider homecoming to be. UAA students, on the other hand, seemingly have absolutely no school spirit. Between students hardly noticing the fact it is homecoming week and the deserted pre-arranged events, an outsider could believe no students actually attend or care about this institution.


The Student Union cafeteria Oct. 14 housed a homecoming quiz show. Sadly, only three groups participated in this event, the sororities Sigma Sigma Sigma and Alpha Sigma Alpha and the fraternity Sigma Phi Epsilon, but far more disturbing was the audience consisting of four people. The outcome was 13 correct answers for Tri Sigma, 12 for Sigma Phi Epsilon and 11 for Alpha Sigma Alpha.

The lack of enthusiasm for this event is indicative of the entire homecoming. One student responded to the question, “What do you think of homecoming week so far?,” with “It’s homecoming week?”

As the week progressed, matters did not improve. The lip sync contest Oct. 15 was expected to be better received than the previous events, according to the homecoming event planners, but hardly anyone showed up. A few more spectators at this event than the quiz bowl, but, at the same time, the number of participants dropped down to two. Only Alpha Sigma Alpha and Tri Sigma participated. Alpha Sigma Alpha came out ahead by a single point for a solitary rendition of “Diamonds are a Girls Best Friend.” The only competition was a group performance of “Braking Up is Hard Enough.”

The three judges of this event, Lora Volden, New Student Orientation director, Linda Lazzell, dean of Student Affairs and Chris Hall, Union of Students president, gave a total of 10 perfect 10 out between the two groups, which, in truth, gave only mediocre presentations suggesting desperation in the very judging of the event.

These two events attracted little more than a couple dozen participants and spectators combined. It is now too late to encourage participation, but just the same, it is your school, so try to pretend you care.

 

Between students hardly noticing the fact it is homecoming week and the deserted pre-arranged events, an outsider could believe no students actually attend or care about this institution.