UAA students Jade Ariah and Danielle Morgan host opening of HER gallery

The gallery in UAA’s Student Union has held dozens of art shows since its opening, each unique and crafted by students on campus. Starting on Feb. 17 and lasting through the first half of March, bachelors of fine arts students Jade Ariah and Danielle Morgan will be taking their turn showcasing their art in the gallery. They titled their project HER, and have been working on their pieces since the idea got approved last year.

Ariah is a 23-year-old art student at UAA, and will be entering the BFA program next fall. Her primary focuses are ceramics and watercolor painting, and she has incorporated both of those talents into her pieces for the HER gallery. Morgan and Ariah met through these art classes and have been working together for a few semesters now.

“Danielle and I had talked about doing a show together in the past, we’ve known each other for a while. I think our work is really similar in the sense that we are both into color theory, and our work has this feminine narrative to it,” Ariah said.

Morgan, 28, will also be starting in the BFA program next fall. Her art centers around women, just as Ariah’s does, but from a different approach. Morgan’s pieces are images that convey self-love and awareness through watercolor painting.

“Lately, it seems that our culture has become more accepting that people are more diverse in many ways. In painting nude figures, it’s my way of practicing self-acceptance and also appreciate the diversity of humans in general. I hope that people can look at my art and feel that too,” Morgan said.

On the opening day of the gallery, Ariah and Morgan will be hosting a reception where viewers can see the gallery for the first time. At this reception, Ariah will also have her handmade feminist icon themed jewelry for sale, where a portion of the profits made will be donated to Planned Parenthood.

Recent events both politically and socially make the HER gallery extremely timely and relevant to most people’s lives. By showcasing how these two student artists feel about feminists and their ideals through art, viewers of the gallery can actively see an entirely different way of voicing an opinion regarding feminism.

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“It’s really important to me that everyone who takes the time to walk through the exhibit to understand what point I’m trying to convey, so I plan to write up text that will be paired with my work, kind of giving a background or history to each piece. I want people to see what my response has been to the modern day treatment of women,” Ariah said.

By having Ariah’s eye-catching feminist sculptures paired with Morgan’s dreamy paintings to promote positive body image, HER will ultimately be a cohesive showcase of the art that these two women have spent the last year working on.