Sultry jazz Canadian style

On her fourth major studio album, sultry Canadian songstress Diana Krall delves into the depths of love and loss.

Following in the footsteps of her platinum-selling 1999 album “?,” Krall brings more of the passionate and romantic edge to her vocals that have allowed her to connect with the 20-something audience that knows of her good looks and covers of jazz standards.

On tracks such as “I remember you” and “The look of love,” Krall let's the words linger behind the strength of the orchestra conducted by Claus Ogerman.

While lacking the name recognition of a Winton Marsalis or Ella Fitzgerald the 27-year-old shines on standards like “Besame mucho” and “Cry me a river.”

Even when Krall takes liberties with the opening track, a cover of the Gershwin's “S'wonderful,” rising and falling in pitch and tempo, escalating the chorus to fight the orchestral arrangement, she draws the listener in with her sultry bass of her crisp voice.

Released Sept.18 on Universal Record's Verve Music Group, the 10-track album runs a relaxing 52 minutes and proffers for the listener the chance to get back in touch with their romantic side.

Most listeners will be drawn to the album by the cover shot of the statuesque Krall, and if they're lucky, they'll rip the cellophane off and discover that there is a magnetic voice behind those eyes.

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Jazz didn't die with the glory days of the 1940's, or the Burt Bacharach-induced spillover of the 1950's. Detroit, New Orleans and Chicago ushered in the Jazz age of the 1920's, but big band was the flavor of choice for most mainstream-white listeners.

“Look” is a return to that age in an updated fashion thanks to producer Tommy LiPuma.

Diana Krall has given the casual jazz fan a reason to sip on that martini and remember that there is more to music than poppy vocals over pre-fabricated hooks. For the jazz connoisseur Krall has given them a collection of songs that have taken a step back in time that may withstand the test of time.