Locals helping locals buy sell and trade.

Come celebrate 30 years!

Located right across the street from Tidal
Wave Books on Northern Lights, Dos Manos
is an art gallery tucked into a conveniently
placed spiral staircase. The three-story staircase
is packed with eclectic local art. The gallery is
co-owned by Kara Kirkpatrick and Stephanie
Johnson.
“It’s all handmade and 95 percent local artists,”
Kirkpatrick said. “They come to us. We’ve
sought out a few of them, but most everybody
hears through word of mouth and they come in
and show us different pieces and see if we want
to take them.”
The gallery features 60 artists with the
mediums ranging from jewelry, purses and
clothing to paintings, prints, and sculptures.
Unique is an understatement when describing
some of the pieces that dot the walls of Dos
Manos.
“We’ve always been really into art, and didn’t
really feel that there was a place around for this kind
of art that tends to locals,” Kirkpatrick said. “We had
talked about it for years, then Steph and I one day just
decided that we were going to jump in head fi rst and
we didn’t turn back.”
But just having the motivation isn’t enough.
According to Kirkpatrick, they found the building
through their bosses from the Moose’s Tooth and Bear
Tooth who owned it previously. The spiral staircase sat
empty until the two owners found it and fell in love.
“It took us a year just to get the place up and going
because we had to pretty much changed everything
but the brown walls. It was a mess,” Kirkpatrick said.
The gallery is anything but a mess now. It celebrated
its second anniversary in September and is part of
the First Friday art walk. The artist featured for the
fi rst Friday of February is Robin Hollis. Hollis is a
photographer that specializes in fl owers. According
to Kirkpatrick, Dos Manos features different artists
on the fi rst of every month. In December, the gallery
featured works by Jake Davis, a local metal worker.
There is only one of his pieces left.
“We’ve got something for everybody. Anything
you can think of, we’ve got it,” Kirkpatrick said. “We
defi nitely like to cater much more to local people; it
seems to do better than the tourist attraction.”
Whoever they cater to, Dos Manos has found its
own niche in the anchorage art scene and is here to
stay.