‘Hunker down’ entertainment: The second dose

Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz extended the emergency “hunker down” order until April 14 in a telephone press briefing, according to ADN.

Graphic by Michaeline Collins.

Clearly, only one list of entertainment recommendations isn’t going to be enough, so here are another six movies and TV shows and something extra to get you through the week.

 

Movies (MPAA rating)

“Hot Fuzz” (R): A 2007 buddy cop action movie starring Simon Pegg as police constable Nicholas Angel. Angel is transferred from bustling London to the rural picturesque town of Sandford, Gloucestershire. He works with his partner, Danny Butterman, to uncover a vast conspiracy that involves the entire town. As you may have noticed already, all the characters have ridiculous names that reveal something about their identity, such as a journalist character having the last name Messenger. “Hot Fuzz” is a ton of fun all the way through with an incredible third act as all is revealed and the conflict is resolved.

“Hot Fuzz” is available to watch on Hulu and buy or rent on YouTube, Google Play Movies & TV, Amazon Prime Video, Vudu and iTunes.

 

- Advertisement -

“Scott Pilgrim vs. the World” (PG-13): A 2010 stylized, comic-book-inspired, action-comedy about Scott Pilgrim, played by Michael Cera, meeting Romona Flowers, played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead, and then proceeding to battle her seven evil exes so that they can date. There’s a battle of the bands, a video-gamey final battle and an excellent underdog story — what’s not to love?

“Scott Pilgrim vs. the World” is available to watch on Netflix and buy or rent on YouTube, Google Play Movies & TV, Amazon Prime Video, Vudu and iTunes.

 

“Snowpiercer” (R): A 2014 science fiction action film starring Chris Evans as a hero that rises up to lead the oppressed working class of a continually moving train. An apocalyptic event has left Earth completely frozen and the last remnants of humanity all live on the same train. Extreme social inequality has led to the division of the back of the train and the front. The ruling class lives in luxury at the front. Meanwhile, the working class are essentially indentured servants and are forced to survive on protein bars made from ground-up insects. “Snowpiercer’s” action scenes take into account the confined space of the train to great effect. In one incredible shootout scene, the train’s length and the angle of the track affect how the firefight plays out.

“Snowpiercer” is available to watch on Netflix and buy or rent on YouTube, Google Play Movies & TV, Amazon Prime Video, Vudu and iTunes.

 

TV shows (TV Parental Guidelines rating)

“What We Do in the Shadows” (TV-MA): A mockumentary comedy featuring four vampire roommates, or flatmates. The four vampires are tasked with taking over North America but have made little progress in hundreds of years. When “The Baron,” who gave them the order, visits, hijinks ensue as they battle werewolves, turn a human into a vampire and get captured by animal control while in bat-form. “What We Do in the Shadows” is about to start its second season on April 15.

“What We Do in the Shadows” was closely based on a 2015 comedic vampire roommate mockumentary of the same name directed by Taika Waititi and Jemaine Clement. I would highly recommend watching the movie beforehand, simply because it’s also a great movie, and it’s always best to watch the source material first. It’s also fairly short, with an 86-minute runtime.

“What We Do in the Shadows” is available to watch on Hulu and buy or rent on YouTube, Google Play Movies & TV, Amazon Prime Video and Vudu.

The original movie, “What We Do in the Shadows,” is available to rent or buy on YouTube, Amazon Prime Video, Google Play Movies & TV, Vudu, iTunes and FandangoNOW.

 

“Firefly” (TV-14): This 2002 space Western drama is written and directed by Joss Whedon and stars Nathan Fillion as Malcolm Reynolds, the captain of a ship called Serenity and a colorful crew. The crew often runs into trouble when Captain Reynolds’ military past catches up to him. It’s an ambitious show that attempts to establish it’s own universe, but never quite got the runtime to do so.

“Firefly” is a cult-classic that will appeal to those looking for adventures in space. Unfortunately, “Firefly” was canceled after only one 14-episode season, although the story did eventually get wrapped up in one final adventure in a 2005 movie sequel titled “Serenity.”

“Firefly” is available to watch on Hulu and buy or rent on YouTube, Google Play Movies & TV, Amazon Prime Video, Vudu and iTunes.

“Serenity” is available to watch on Hulu with the STARZ add-on and buy or rent on YouTube, Google Play Movies & TV, Amazon Prime Video, Vudu and iTunes.

 

“Brooklyn Nine-Nine” (TV-14): A police procedural comedy starring comedian Andy Samberg as police Detective Jake Peralta at the 99th Precinct. His coworkers, played in part by Terry Crews, Melissa Fumero, Joe Lo Truglio, Chelsea Peretti and Stephanie Beatriz, all bring their unique personalities to the mix as cases appear and are closed. Captain Raymond Holt, played by Andre Braugher, constantly has a straight face and is impossible to read. To give some idea how serious “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” takes itself, every Halloween episode, there is a heist competition to see who can steal an object and be proclaimed the ultimate detective/genius.

“Brooklyn Nine-Nine” was canceled after its fifth season, but renewed by NBC the following day after considerable fan outcry. It’s now in its seventh season.

“Brooklyn Nine-Nine” is available to watch for free with ads on NBC.com, with a subscription on Hulu, YouTube TV, Sling TV, fuboTV and bought on YouTube.

 

Wildcard: YouTube channel

Brutalmoose is primarily a review channel. A guy with very long hair named Ian reviews pretty much everything: frozen foods, campy movies and obscure ‘90s video games. His frozen food and recipe reviews are the real highlights. Ian makes no claims to be even remotely competent in the kitchen and as a result, it’s hilarious to watch him stumble through preparing a recipe. There’s also sometimes a “can’t stop watching a train wreck aspect” to some really weird recipes, such as making ramen noodle smores or Twinkie hotdogs.

Ian has also reviewed a few kids “do it yourself” kits. These kits use some sort of black magic to turn a few powders mixed with water and then microwaved into an entire burger. As he says himself, Ian doesn’t always know the right words to describe food textures or taste, but it’s always fun to watch him eat awful food that you should never eat if you’re trying to live beyond 40 years old.