Halloween affected positively in response to terrorism

Before last month's terrorist attacks, Jesse Gallaher was going to dress up as Aladdin. Now he's changed his mind.

“I'd probably get my ass kicked,” said Gallaher, a junior history major.

A little over a month after terrorist attacks, America faces its first major holiday. But real-life terror hasn't taken the horror out of Halloween.

Students plan on celebrating this year's night of fright as they normally would. They will go to costume parties, brave haunted houses and take children trick-or-treating. When it comes to which costumes they'd choose, many agree they will be more sensitive. I'ts expected that no one will dress up as an Arab or terrorist. Some said they will be more sensitive to fake bruises and amputated body parts.

Nate Williams, a graduate student studying special education, plans on throwing a costume party with his wife.

“Celebrating is a necessary form of relief from the stress we've experienced over this,” Williams said. “It could be viewed as part of the grieving process. We said we weren't going to let the terrorists win by making us fearful. If we don't celebrate Halloween because of the attacks, then we're letting them win.”

“Boys still like the scary, gory masks,” Party World owner Polly Curry said. “They're sticking with it.”

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But many costumes being sold have a serious side. Fireman costumes are selling with more popularity, and Curry says she has seen more interest than usual in policemen.

Susan Sparrowgrove, who owns Halloween Express in the Dimond Center Mall, ordered costumes back in April and May.

“My Arab costumes aren't moving,” Sparrowgrove said. “I haven't sold a single one.”

However, she's had a lot of people come in requesting Osama Bin Laden masks. Red, white and blue hair spray has been another very popular item.

There'll be plenty of celebration happening on campus this year. UAA's annual Rocky Horror Picture Show will take place Oct. 26 in the Campus Center Den at 10 p.m. Club Council will be hosting Haunted Halloween Fun Night on Oct. 27 in the Campus Center from 5 p.m. to midnight. It will be a carnival with candy and traditional games, a cakewalk and pin the tail on the donkey.