Comedian connects to college audience

With an odd pairing of past histories and witty quips made toward audience members, Alexandra McHale amused students and locals alike Dec. 3 in the Student Union Den. The event, sponsored by Student Activities, also included a drive for gloves and socks to be given to the Covenant House, a shelter for wayward teenagers.

Student Activities decided to donate to Covenant House during the holiday season because organizers felt it fitting to have college students helping others close to their age, and it gives students a sense of connection to the community.

Much of McHale’s routine was based on personal stories: cheerleaders she saw knock their teeth out, friends too drunk to stand and idiocies of her own life. Many of her stories dealt with college life and her many experiences with comic shows on college campuses.

“I enjoyed all the jokes towards college life, they kind of connected the audience to her,” said junior Joanne Morgan. “I enjoyed and agreed with a lot of what she said college life is all about and that she pointed out what was stupidly funny about it.”


McHale’s usual routine was broken almost from the start by a photographer’s assistant walking hunchbacked across the front of the stage in order to get better lighting for the pictures. This small distraction sent McHale into an entire string of questions, posed primarily to the photographer, as the assistant seemed reluctant to answer. The incident with the photographer turned into a running skit that McHale jumped back to time and time again throughout her performance.

“Is she your Egor, only allowed to speak in single syllables, hobbling along to do your bidding?” McHale said to the photographer.

“It was perfect when that photo girl crept across the stage,” said local Andrew Riddily. “It made a great joke for the comedian to start off with, and it allowed her to kind of go off her usual routine and just joke around with the audience.”

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The audience seemed reluctant to laugh at the beginning of the show, maybe because the crowd was smaller than usual.


“I can’t really explain why more people didn’t show,” said audience member John Sriford. “I’ve come to a few of these and the crowd has always been larger. Maybe it’s jitters over finals but I have hardly begun to study for them, so who knows.”

Despite the small crowd, the frequent interruptions, and the oddities that come with any comic performer, by the end, the audience seemed to have warmed up to McHale and all involved seemed to have enjoyed the experience.

Much of McHale’s routine was based on personal stories: cheerleaders she saw knock their teeth out, friends too drunk to stand and idiocies of her own life.