‘2D/3D Invitational Art Show’ brings together art of all mediums

The annual “2D/3D Invitational Art Show” displays work created by upper-division art students at UAA chosen by their professors. Each piece is made in different mediums, such as watercolor, graphic design and ceramics.

Professors of each medium choose students from their classes to display their work. Alanna DeRocchi, a term instructor of art and ceramics, chose three students from her classes that showed a variety of skills.

“This exhibition shows the range in talent and creative expression of our UAA art students who are becoming more involved and focused on their ideas and material exploration,” DeRocchi said.

DeRocchi says she admires the work UAA art students produce.

“[I’m] always so impressed and surprised by the quality and variety of work made by UAA art students. The [Department of Art] is a very special program on campus, and I feel so fortunate to get to work with so many creative individuals,” DeRocchi said.

A few of the artists with work on display in the exhibition spoke about their pieces and inspirations over email.

 

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Selene Stoll 

Stoll is a senior graduating this semester with a bachelor of arts in digital art and illustration and minor in anthropology.

Artwork by Selene Stoll.
Artwork by Selene Stoll.
Artwork by Selene Stoll.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: When did you start working on the artwork and how long did it take to complete?

A: “I started working on [the Pepo and Kauen comic] last semester due to a bet [that] I had with the [professor]. I said that I could do a comic in three weeks, and he said if I could do that while maintaining quality, then it must be worth a good grade. My advantage was that I’ve been on comic deadlines before.”

 

Q: What was your inspiration in creating this piece?

A: “My inspiration is the theme of spooky Halloween, LGBT genres of found families and my foster kids and their fascination with ouija boards. My pieces are usually aimed at my foster kids and in that respect, they tend to be cartoony, colorful and a little too edgy.”

 

Q: How do you feel about having your work on display?

A: “I’m very excited to have people see my comic. I hope [viewers aren’t] too skittish to pick up a copy and read it for themselves. In a gallery setting, it can be frowned upon to touch or pick up any art pieces on display, however my art… requires that you do so.”

 

Q: What are your career plans after graduation?

A: “My… plan is to work hard in getting into an animation studio so I can work on art full time. It’s going to take work just like any other profession… I’m willing to put in the miles.”

 

Aileen Page

Page is a senior graduating this semester with a bachelor of fine arts with a primary focus in ceramics and secondary focus in drawing.

Page describes her piece in the exhibition as “a round wood carving of two figures decorated with watercolor and gold leaf.”

 

Q: When did you start working on the artwork and how long did it take to complete?

A: “I first started [working] on this piece last year for my experimental drawing class. It took me about a month to finish.”

 

Q: What was your inspiration in creating this piece?

A: “With this piece, I was trying to explore concepts I was working through in my primary concentration. It’s very different from what I normally create. I’ve carved wood in printmaking and… painted with watercolor before, but never combined the two. [The piece] is very different, but the inspiration stemmed from a similar thread in my other projects.”

 

Q: How do you feel about having your work on display?

A: “I enjoy having opportunities to share my work outside of my class [and the] art department. I’m very excited to see what work is in the show and for others to see my piece.”

 

Q: What are your career plans after graduation?

A: “I plan to continue working with clay after I graduate and maybe one day have my own studio.”

 

Rose Hendrickson

Hendrickson is a junior art major with a primary focus in sculpture and a secondary focus in ceramics.

“Raven Dance,” created by Rose Hendrickson in 2019, depicts two birds circling each other and is made from fabricated steel. Photo courtesy of Rose Hendrickson.

Along with a steel sculpture titled “Raven Dance,” Hendrickson also has two red earthenware sculptures titled “When I Was Young” and “Hoard” on display in the exhibition.

“When I was Young,” created by Rose Hendrickson in 2019 with red earthenware and acrylic gesso. Photo courtesy of Rose Hendrickson.

Q: When did you start working on the artwork and how long did it take to complete?

A: “I started each of these pieces at different times, but they were all done in 2019.”

“Hoard,” crafted by Rose Hendrickson in 2019, is made of red earthenware, glazes and acrylic paint. Photo courtesy of Rose Hendrickson.

Q: What was your inspiration in creating these pieces?

A: “My inspiration for each piece starts with the professional prompt for the assignments. We are free to choose the subjects we develop within [the] processes, and my inspirations usually come from my environment or reflect my observations in general.”

 

Q: How do you feel about having your work on display?

A: “I am always excited to have my work on display. The pieces I create are like my children; I am always proud to show them off.”

 

Q: What are your career plans after graduation?

A: “I am a ‘non-traditional’ student. I am completing my first art degree after being a working artist with a small practice for over 40 years. [My] career plans are to expand my art practice, work [and create] as much as possible and hopefully become involved in producing some public art pieces.”

 

Artwork from Stoll, Page and Hendrickson, along with pieces from other art students, are on display in the “2D/3D Invitational Art Show” in the Hugh McPeck Gallery in the Student Union from Feb. 17-March 25. The gallery is open Monday-Thursday from 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.