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Mabil “Mo” Duir leaves footprints of inspiration image (1) - Mabil “Mo” Duir leaves a legacy of peace and encouragement at the University of Alaska Anchorage. The social activist and student leader passed away Saturday night. Full view

Mabil “Mo” Duir leaves footprints of inspiration

 

Mabil “Mo” Duir leaves a legacy of peace and encouragement at the University of Alaska Anchorage. The social activist and student leader passed away Saturday night.
Mabil “Mo” Duir leaves a legacy of peace and encouragement at the University of Alaska Anchorage. The social activist and student leader passed away Saturday night.

A lot of people think planning to save the world is naïve.

Mabil “Mo” Duir was not one of those people.

“Mabil had amazing aspirations and wanted to help so many people. He was a huge advocate for helping the underprivileged. Mabil had great ideas of ways he could change the world for the better,” business sophomore Max Bullock said. He said Duir lived with him and his family for a semester, and he loved him as his own brother and best friend. Together, they wanted to create an organization for underprivileged youth to equip them with the tools and skills they need to be successful in life called The Max and Mo Foundation. He hopes to some day still create the organization to honor his friend.

Psychology junior Ashley Gaines was also a good friend of Duir’s.

“He always had a smile on his face. He was just a great person,” she said.

She mentioned an adage her mom and grandmother always said about the importance of giving people flowers when they’re alive instead of when they’re dead. She said she felt like she didn’t give Mo his flowers.

According to Duir’s friends, he had many aspirations including working for the government to be the Secretary of Defense and teaching English in his home country Sudan.

He immigrated to the United States when he was four years old.

While a student at UAA, he revived the Board of Cultural Awareness with the goal of discussing ethnic issues on campus. He was also actively advocating for the creation of African American and Hispanic history courses on campus. Among many other things, Mo was active in the UAA Black Student Union, Youth Council at NAACP, and a boxer at Daniel Boxing School.

Bullock said he wants the public to know that Duir was not involved in gangs or drugs. “He hated both with a passion,” he said.

Mabil “Mo” Duir poses with his TKE fraternity brothers at a hockey game against Minnesota last semester.
Mabil “Mo” Duir poses with his TKE fraternity brothers at a hockey game against Minnesota last semester.

Bullock said Mabil was a provider for his family back in Africa, and without him they no longer have a main source of income. He said those interested in donating money for the family should contact Mo’s uncle Lul Kayier, at 907-306-0885.

Lul said he was not ready to talk about his nephew but wants people to know he did not have a life insurance plan and the family is accepting donations for burial services also.

Annie Route, director of student life and leadership, said a memorial will be held from 4:30-6 p.m. Wednesday in the Student Union cafeteria. The event is open to the public and parking is free.
Paula Fish, assistant director of student leadership, said students interested in helping plan the memorial should contact her at 907-786-1371.

On campus counselors are also available for grievance services at 907-786-4040. Sessions are free to students enrolled in six or more credit hours.

Correction: An original version of this story incorrectly identifies Lul Kayier.

Written by J. Almendarez

J. Almendarez is a journalism junior who transferred to UAA this fall from San Antonio College, located in South Texas. At SAC, she worked at the national award winning student publication, The Ranger, as a reporter, photographer, Multimedia Editor and Executive Editor. After graduation next fall, she plans to work as a reporter for a daily in South Texas. Eventually, she would like to earn a Master's degree in Media Convergence. After a long career in journalism, she will go back to San Antonio College, teach a reporting class and die while preaching in front of a group of students about the importance of legit journalism and AP Style.

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